We started a new streaming radio endeavor on FCCFreeRadio. Our station’s site KCYX: Radio Kill is all about the show. We are currently on Hiatus. The first show had the classic “first show” gremlins all come out in series. The second week had a new batch of technical gremlins—but such is life with live shows & limited access to equipment. The first show focused on current music with a few throwbacks to early industrial. The total of six shows might be available still, but all that is up in the air at this point.

To not spam people not into the music, I will only post things about music we play or like on the KCYX Page — it also has push notifications. This is a joint-venture between me and a long time friend. We had guests  & plan to have more guests as well. So, check it out if you like music you won’t usually hear on terrestrial radio. The last show had ManifestiV stop in to talk about their tour & future releases.

Shows (should they continue) will play current electro/industrial/goth/darkwave/post-punk/etc. (basically the alternative music that was never labeled “alternative” in its day, but gracenote doesn’t recognize the genres by their actual names).

Thanks for reading.

The commercially available GUI is now over 30 years old. We all know that what was once a paradigm altering way that communications engineers, researchers & computer scientists could interact with their machine has firmly cemented itself in the landscape of interfaces, as the mice and trackpads that came with it. Initially the GUI was called a novelty that would quickly wear out its welcome by companies that have since staked everything on their misunderstanding of how a GUI should act. Now that a more common use paradigm is direct touch. The conventions useful & familiar with the desktop metaphor have been replaced by a graphic icon collection to open an app suited to the task. Again people who’s thinking is still bound by conventions of prior use paradigms that either work poorly or not at all without alteration to fit into new paradigms is hobbling the efficiency of their user base. The base-line of porting UI to a tocuh UI has been accomplished: where it was a double click to open, it is just one tap; where it was a menu bar window, it is now a navbar & bottom “tab/panel/view.”

However, Before this current paradigm shift happened, the GUI had already been mutating between versions & various OS platforms until new conventions were tried & failed or took root. Often multiple ways to interact are allowed in most desktop OSes, & between platforms some interactions are preferred, while other are simply cumbersome. Somewhere along the way the fundamentals of UI design were forgotten & exchanged for the slickest looking UI and usability took a backseat to aesthetics because the people who placed aesthtics fist didn’t realize that aesthetics and usability are tied together.  Thus the interactions needed to perform an advanced task became unnecessarily cumbersome, and furthered the knowledge gap between the novice and the competent.

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If I chose a current AppleWatch

Waiting for the DT Camera version…

Investors are being fed news of some massive Apple Watch sales decrease since its release. Oddly the overall percentage of the market of people that use the iPhones (iPhone 5 & up) that work with the Watch that actually bought the Watch is inline with historic sales trends of other accessory technology. Most technology accessories, from bluetooth headphones to keyboards to eye wear face significantly lower sales numbers. At the current Apple Watch price point, the percentage is actually abnormally high given inexpensive accessories run under $100 and might get 4% adoption (this translates to something you can observe: less than 1 in 20 people that own a tablet have a bluetooth keyboard.) Whereas Apple Watch owners are almost equal to that within a 2 month launch for a device that starts at $350. While only 1 in 5 people in the U.S. have an iPhone, of those, the number that have or plan to get an Apple Watch are 1 in 10, conservatively.

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The Included watch band with special modifications

The Shine after 5 months. You can’t even see extra security I added from the front while wearing the Shine (scuff not included)

First off, full disclosure: Misfit gave me a Shine — not for review — but as thanks for spotting and letting them know about a minor error on one of their pages on the day they announced a related product. So, given that it was free, it was something I was grateful to receive, and established the goodwill of the people at Misfit. The thing is, I’m not exactly the type that monitors and logs everything I do. In fact, given my physical limitations (mentioned before), I can’t often follow a workout regimen to stay in shape anymore. However, I am naturally curious, and after almost 6 months using the Shine, I have been able to use it as a way to monitor my daily activity and adjust how much I eat. This review examines what is an almost perfect product at this price point from the PoV of someone that isn’t interested in (or can’t afford) the current smartwatch offerings. On this level, the Shine succeeds to offer a simple way to monitor daily sleep and wake activity. Read on to see how it accomplishes this.

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I myself see patterns, causes/effects and hierarchies everywhere. I’ve mentioned how open I am to new ideas, and acknowledged how fluid my relational thinking is. I can take one reference and smash it together with another reference, so when 2 seemingly disparate ideas intersect through a cognitive relational leap, I synthesize a new link at the junction. This starts me thinking about my own mind. Did my R-side push these two things at me? Yes.

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I love music, but I only know about a 10% of the lyrics of the music I listen ot if that. Sure I can (try to) sing Assimilate but invariably get at least some lines wrong or can’t remember them at all — or the singer is behind an even thicker wall of vocal distortion. So, When I can I look up lyrcis and paste them into my music files.

But with literally hundreds of GBs of music, I can’t take the time to lookup every song’s lyrics and paste them in because it’s at least a 5 step process. The thing is steps 1-3 involves simply looking up the lyrics which I always WISH I could skip. I found a way to do just that using Alfred’s powerpack workflows. If you want to know more, make the jump through hyperspace & I’ll tell ya’ on the other side (assuming we don’t bounce off a solar flare or get sucked into a black hole, kid)…

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For years I have told people about Quality of Service (QoS) and how it relates to gaming, mostly in person or via chat. Often to help a fellow Clan Lord player iron out the cases where someone on their connection is watching video or their local network (usually a WiFi LAN) has maxed out its bandwidth.

I have been long meaning to write this out. But rather than reinvent the wheel, I found this well illustrated guide explaining QoS while trying to help yet another CL player understand how to fix his “someone watching Netflix is causing too much lag to play” syndrome.

Note: manufacturers call it various things: QoS, Port Priority, “Gamer class/grade”, even “Media Router” etc. It’s all basically the same thing: prioritizing ports to guarantee certain types of traffic is prioritized by port number to guaranty a certain level of quality of that service.

http://www.howtogeek.com/75660/the-beginners-guide-to-qos-on-your-router/

Dear all you great companies making awesome products,

For most of you, I like to be informed of new products, and some I already bought your product and really don’t NEED to know about promos for gadgets & software I already have. So, If I were running the communications for the company, I would do what I have done on my blog, but better. Read on for my idea of how to make the most of your communications.

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I’m a freelance IT consultant. I So, get asked a lot of questions. Unfortunately, I wish people would ask me what the last article addressed more, but this is about how I handle calling tech support. Clients pay consultants for answers and output, but often the online knowledge bases for larger companies are labyrinths of outdated dead ends and no way to filter as fine grained as advanced/extendable schema database apps can be — I know, I’ve designed a DB that could reduce and search to one text entry and 2–4 clicks. It’s crazy only a few web apps have this — well, kind of.*

I’ve been a fairly successful consultant who gets most of my business by clients referring me to someone who needs my skill set. My years as a support tech taught me how to quickly sync with a mode of communication the client understands to quickly gather symptoms and explained things in concepts they can grasp. In short, I handle clients at various levels — from SoHo end users to local businesses of various sizes.One skill I have from working in many shops is calling tech support…

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