MacBook

All posts tagged MacBook

TL;DR: These Rock. sound great, work well… 5 Stars

TL;DR: These Rock. sound great, work well… 5 Stars

A while back I wrote a review of the Kanex AirBlue, and gave it the thumbs up for its sound quality and easy of use. As I mentioned I was burned by Best Buy’s in-house Rocketfish Bluetooth headset, and didn’t want to spend north of $60 for another headset that ended up in the junk drawer. Well, I always keep an eye out for products, new or old that fit the bill: I wanted an (1) easy to connect Bluetooth Headset that had (2) good stereo audio quality for music and a (3) a mic for phone calls where (4) people could hear me clearly on the other end. The Rocketfish only fit the second and third criteria, and I had been using the AirBlue since the Rocketfish broke after 3 or 4 months.

I saw the NoiseHush NS 400 on sale at NewEgg for $35 — well under my $50 limit for a BT headset — about a month and a half ago. I don’t think I should have to pay much more for wireless headset than a tethered headset of the same audio quality. So, given I think decent quality can be found for around $25, if I add the battery, buttons and bluetooth transceiver, it should be less than $45. In case you are wondering, the NoiseHush NS400 meets or exceeds my criteria for what a bluetooth headset should be.

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Okay,

Quickly: This month has been a “lurning [sic] experience.” I am juggling multiple projects which are all related only by the fact that they’re simply making me a better designer. New tricks are being learned, etc. Sites are going up and being moved, and I’ll be updating everything and essentially leveraging what I learn in one place and using it in another.

I finally figured out I needed to buy more RAM for my laptop: sometimes there is less than 16MB of free RAM and over 700K page-outs in a few days of heavy use. The thing would slow to glacial pace during heavy loads. It’s really been holding me back. Who knew 4GB wasn’t enough!?!? So, I broke down and ordered a few more gigs. Luckily, installing is a piece of cake on my MBP. I was in and out of a friend’s machine in less than 15 minutes without cutting any safety corners. I also need to get another HD and replace the optical drive. OR I can just breakdown and backup over WiFi and offload some files. But I like the idea of having everything with me.

Another, non-web, but information related project is advancing slowly, but it is way too soon to even talk about. I am still researching to decide the best approach. Some of my closest friends know about it, and I think about it all the time. It is currently possible: all the building blocks are there, but no one has put them together yet. I should probably stop spouting off about it to people who work for huge computer companies though. But for all I know someone has already patented it? I dunno, I heard if you research a patent it is worse if you get sued. :

Anyway, my plan is to release it under a non-commercial open licensing scheme, so that pizza fueled one man ops can use it freely, and large corps that can pay may license it. But as I said, someone might have already patented the pieces, but I think this would probably fall under derivative works. I’m not sure because I am not a patent lawyer. It sucks that I have to keep the cards close to my vest because copyright: originally designed to encourage innovation, is now a club that large corporations use on each other daily. Recently I read about a patent lawsuit about emoticons in a pull down menu on Ars, It seems silly to anyone, but that’s how whacked patent law is. The funny thing is, within my circle of friends I probably have all the people I would need to start developing this thing in earnest, but first I’ll go in sideways with build-up projects.

A big thanks to those people with everything from bachelors to PhD degrees in CS and related fields that I have the greatest conversations with. I learn something new every time I get a chance to pick one of these people’s brains.

Apologies about any incorrect punctuation marks or typos. I’m typing this on the fly before heading off somewhere. Cheers!

RAM Speed Calculation

I see a lot of confusion about this subject so here is a quick guide for finding out what sort of RAM your computer takes. Let’s say you are out at a store, and see what looks like a great deal on some more RAM for your computer, but you don’t know what type to get. To find out what memory “PC#-XXXX{X}” your computer needs but you don’t have a manual handy, do the following:

If you know your data rate (1066 or more commonly 1333 these days) multiply it by 8 and round to the nearest hundred (but most manufacturers round down) and you can figure out what goes in the XXXX{X}. A data rate of 1333 * 8 = 10664 or “10600,” the “#” is for the data rate type. So  PC3-10600 (SO-204pin) is what 2011 MacBook Pros take. It is DDR3  1333 Memory.

My MacBook Pro (2009: 5,5) takes DDR3 – 1066. Using a quick bit o’ Math, that translates to PC3-8500

Macs Are Easy

If you happen to have your computer handy and you are on a Mac, you can also open the System Information Application located in

Applications/Utility/System Information (System Profiler in previous OS X releases)>Memory

or

Apple Menu>About This Mac>More Info…>Memory and it will tell you what type of DRAM it takes and how many slots are full.

Where to Buy

Among my favorite Mac hardware resources is Other World Computing because their prices are competitive and they stand behind their products. I had purchased RAM from OWC that ended up being defective. I did not find this out until my new installation of Leopard started crashing under heavy memory loads. (they change how OS X uses memory to use more of it if available, and when I upgraded the memory that was usually not used in 10.4, was activated in 10.5 to speed the system up.) But this discovery took place over a year after I purchased the memory from them. I was hoping “lifetime guaranty” meant what it suggested—a hassle free exchange. It took one phone call, my invoice number and about 10 minutes for them to cross ship a replacement set out to me. It was truly hassle free. Since then they are my first consideration when buying new memory. So, if their prices are within $10–15 of competitors, I go with them.

CSS3 animations & less layout headaches are pretty slick, but I’m not going to bother supporting MS browser quirks. I’ll wait for them to catch up. The person it matters to only cares about iPad compatibility (He uses Win7, but only FireFox). Mozilla browsers benefit from being closer to standards compliant though and the CSS property names are almost identical to webkit and the proposed standard. I’ll pop up the standard “Upgrade your browser to a web standards compliant one” with links to FF, Safari, Chrome, etc. considering Opera & others.

IE isn’t even on my radar anyway because no one I know uses it, and every time I have encountered it in the last year is when someone uses it to download one of the other browsers. I see more MacBooks and MacBook Pros and iPad at various coffee shops now than Windows Notebooks or Netbooks. It is clear that the tide has turned, but the business sector hasn’t realized it yet. About 5 years ago, after I got my 3rd Mac Laptop, I started working at coffee shops because I can get more done than anywhere else. (No one wants to interrupt the guy in black with headphones on furiously pounding away at the keyboard faster than they can and is always waiting for his computer to catch up to him.

Odd that none of CSS3 is finalized yet. It works great when it works though. I do wish there were better ways to see precedence of style definitions without uploading and without counting element, class and id priorities. Luckily Safari’s Develop Menu is extremely helpful at tracking down the ordering.

I just wish Coda, my Web Development program of choice, was updated with things like code folding, CSS3 compatibility and AJAX help.

I’ve found a ton of useful links in learning the newer (but still not finalized) CSS3, but the most helpful documentation is the actual W3C Working Drafts because they go into the “why” you want to do things this way and considerations others have noted in red which is pretty interesting. However, when it comes to drop down menus and the like I’ve have found very few guides that explain the syntax and reasoning while explaining the techniques.

I am really looking forward to CSS3’s grid module, but the box module is no slouch either, and using it is disgustingly easy. It works the way I wish bock elements did. If the browser makers all decided to support this stuff fully, post-haste, we could see web sites require a lot less time to do UI design and refaces.

I had more, but it is worthy of its own post…