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Facebook, Google+ and the like each have different rules about what should happen to digital assets after an account holder passes on. Specifically, Facebook’s mishandling digital content of deceased user’s has been very public, and reported on every few years. Each time Facebook claims to have a process to convert the deceased’s pages to memorial page, the process is less than transparent, nor easy. The last time a friend passed away, we learned that Facebook required proof of death to be sent to them by an immediate family member. There is no online mechanisms to facilitate this, nor can the process be monitored once sent.

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webfracking

A few years ago, I started leaving Social Media because the social media left me… While people are aware of what is happening in SoNet space, the idea of what and why they are doing this has not been crystalized and formalized. Late last year, I wrote a piece that I decided to sit on and let gel a bit more. Then a few announcements were made in the past month that lend credibility to my hypothesis that SoNetCorps are engaging in WebFracking. Read more on Dice. And look at the link storm of references to support the article’s accuracy below if you wish.

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App.net might look like just another social service to some. And, in fact, it currently looks very much like Twitter was when it started: It is just a lot of tech-savvy people talking freely and enthusiastically about app.net and whatever strikes their fancy: No celebrities promoting themselves, no ad-spam, no fake users, no incredibly stupid posts—although there are some stupid posts, there’s no one stupid enough to post public calls to kill government officials as one woman who has disappeared did. App.net is just a lot of signal with very low noise.

I get at least a few invites each month to join a new SoNet. The invites usually get a tossed into the trash almost immediately. Few get me to look at the site. But that’s usually it. Even if I do sign up the to site, I often let it languish and simply forget about it until they start spamming me to use their site, “log in with…” or want me to link my other SoNets to it.

Paying not to Share but Selectively Share

App.net is 180° away from ll of these sites though, because their interests align with my interests:

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Unfortunately, I might have bigger fish than CSS3 to fry soon. In the past week I heard about Google spying on people, even those in private mode (I would link to the video, but Google has apparently buried it since the station reporting it uses Google for their search and video); Facebook arguing in court that everyone is “Famous” to their friends so they can use your pictures and name in advertisements; another security flaw that makes 4 out of every 1000 RSA certs easy to crack; Nortel networks that were completely pwned by chinese hackers for a decade, recycled botnet code repurposed for stealing passwords, SoNet’s inflated user number (not a surprise — about 50% of the social network accounts are fake or unused), the Megaupload seizure, and the list goes on! Much of that I read on Ars.

The interesting thing about the Google story is that a person interviewed for the report said that to Google, its users are the product… hmmm, someone I know wrote that a few months back, hehe. (Sadly, not many saw it because it was rejected by Dice.) Anyway, I still have to write my Apps o’ Fame list, but I’m not sure whether to submit it and wait for a month or two or just post it here without editing or delay. (Thus why this update is posted here.)

Social Networking is the hottest property on the internet. Social Networks (SoNets) allow better targeted marketing and allow companies a glimpse into who is buying their products.

Most companies on the internet either have or are working on ways to establish  positive mindshare by encouraging customers to talk about their products and build communities based on common product interests.

It used to be that the best source for information on what people were buying was financial institutions, which tracked what each account was buying, as well as large retailers that offered a wide range of products. Getting this valuable data was expensive and not always easy. Slowly, large online retailers discovered cross-promotion and established partnerships sharing customer information.

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