music

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We started a new streaming radio endeavor on FCCFreeRadio. Our station’s site KCYX: Radio Kill is all about the show. We are currently on Hiatus. The first show had the classic “first show” gremlins all come out in series. The second week had a new batch of technical gremlins—but such is life with live shows & limited access to equipment. The first show focused on current music with a few throwbacks to early industrial. The total of six shows might be available still, but all that is up in the air at this point.

To not spam people not into the music, I will only post things about music we play or like on the KCYX Page — it also has push notifications. This is a joint-venture between me and a long time friend. We had guests  & plan to have more guests as well. So, check it out if you like music you won’t usually hear on terrestrial radio. The last show had ManifestiV stop in to talk about their tour & future releases.

Shows (should they continue) will play current electro/industrial/goth/darkwave/post-punk/etc. (basically the alternative music that was never labeled “alternative” in its day, but gracenote doesn’t recognize the genres by their actual names).

Thanks for reading.

I love music, but I only know about a 10% of the lyrics of the music I listen ot if that. Sure I can (try to) sing Assimilate but invariably get at least some lines wrong or can’t remember them at all — or the singer is behind an even thicker wall of vocal distortion. So, When I can I look up lyrcis and paste them into my music files.

But with literally hundreds of GBs of music, I can’t take the time to lookup every song’s lyrics and paste them in because it’s at least a 5 step process. The thing is steps 1-3 involves simply looking up the lyrics which I always WISH I could skip. I found a way to do just that using Alfred’s powerpack workflows. If you want to know more, make the jump through hyperspace & I’ll tell ya’ on the other side (assuming we don’t bounce off a solar flare or get sucked into a black hole, kid)…

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I got a ton of flack from people on Ars when I commented that CD quality audio lost a lot of information that greatly affected a listener’s perception, and MP3 and other compressed audio formats simply made a bad situation worse.

I over-simplified my argument to keep it approachable, and had some wannabe audio experts quoting the Shannon-Nyquist theorem. They must have read ahead or did not understand the geek-speak for what needs to be true for the theorem to be valid. I figure they didn’t even read the prerequisites needed, and do not understand music enough to know that pretty much no music falls into the prerequisite category — having a constant frequency.

Apparently, Neil Young agrees. I was unaware that his hatred of MP3s is probably greater than mine until he announced Pono. Young has been on the road showing off and evangelizing better quality audio. There has been a lot of buzz about it — not just because he is such an iconic figure in music, but because the 3 big music companies (Warner, Sony and Universal) will sign up to support the better quality format.

In my post: 44kHz is not enough. I decided that a good compromise between file size and quality would be 24bit, 128kHz. But Young has decided that the studio quality digital audio woule be supported which is typically 192kHz/32bit. (Apple’s ALAC actually supports up to twice the sample rate, but it is probably future-proofing the format.) My hope is that this will not be yet another failed better quality audio format. The reasoning is two-fold:

  1. I want higher quality audio than what is currently available.
  2. I want the influx of bandwidth consumption to wake up consumers, and have them apply pressure to the communications companies* to increase speeds so that even a slow connection could stream 1–2MB/s.

See http://techland.time.com/2012/10/01/pono-neil-young/ for an article and video of Young and Letterman talking about Pono. So all in all, this is good news.

Update: I have since found bandcamp for the lossless CD quality audio, which will have to do until more albums from artists I follow are available on HDtracks.

*The telecoms monopolized our internet access landscape about a decade ago, after G.W. Bush overturned the laws that prevented de-facto monopolies. The laws that were repealed forced the telecoms to open up their lines (the cost of installation was funded by the government in many cases) thereby flattening the bandwidth speed increase curve. This lead to many smaller ISPs dying and fewer jobs in every region of the country. In turn, since there was little to no real competition, there was little-to-no incentive to increase internet speeds. The same 6Mbps connection has been offered for $40 or more the last half decade. But that is another topic.